The Mind Body Medicine behind The Jñānam Method™

The Jñānam Method™ represents a unified potpourri of related styles and methods, based on my own experience that conjugate styles of bodyweight core training can assist in the rehabilitation of scarred musculoskeletal tissue and the full recovery of function. The primary objective of The Jñānam Method™ is the complete restoration of mobility and functional performance to the spine, the limbs and the socket joints of the body.

Because musculoskeletal dominance in the body can lead to overtraining of dominant muscles, The Jñānam Method™ breaks up the exercise routine and offers more movement variety.

I developed The Jñānam Method™ for my own body of mature age to prevent sarcopenia, characterized by the progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass (a.k.a. atrophy) and strength.

The Jñānam Method™ incorporates the techniques in the tradition of Krishnamacharya for individuals of mature age who will benefit from particular provisions (appropriate modifications, props) to help support the stretch, while maintaining the full length of the spinal column.

Jñān (ज्ञान pronounced gyān) means intuition. Applied to physical fitness, jñān represents tactical training.

Muscle

Neuromuscular Dynamics

It is important to develop a practical knowledge of breath-oriented, myoneural exercise therapy for the back, the socket joints and the extremities.

What is Neuromuscular Dynamics?

Muscle spindles are small encapsulated sensory receptors that have a spindle-like or fusiform shape and are located within the fleshy part of the muscle.

Myotatic Reflex (Liddell-Sherrington reflex) occurs when the muscle spindles react to stretching by contracting the skeletal muscle.

Sherrington’s Law of Reciprocal Innervation: When contraction of a muscle is stimulated, there is a simultaneous inhibition of its antagonist. The reciprocal inhibition reflex causes the stretched muscle group to relax when the shortened muscle group is tensed.

The neuronal circuit that causes reciprocal inhibition is called reciprocal innervation.

Golgi tendon organ

Golgi Tendon Organ

Inverse myotatic reflex (a.k.a. Golgi tendon reflex) is a bisynaptic reflex, initiated by the Golgi tendon organ located in muscle tendons. However, unlike the muscle spindle, which acts as a length-detector, the Golgi tendon organ acts as a tension-detector.

To prevent damage to the tendon due to the muscle pulling too hard on it, the inverse myotatic (relaxation) reflex is initiated by increasing tension in the tendon, and the contraction of the muscle is inhibited.

Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF) Stretching Techniques in a Nutshell

Hold-Relax (using the Golgi tendon organ): Place the restricted muscle in a position of stretch, followed by an isometric contraction of the restricted muscle. Relax and hold the passive stretch at a greater range.

Contract-Relax-Antagonist-Contract (using reciprocal inhibition): Place the restricted muscle in a position of stretch, followed by an isometric contraction of the agonist. Relax the agonist muscle, and isometrically contract the antagonist muscle.

Mindfulness in Education

I am interested in the endeavour of lifelong learning and the promise of open learning or the social experiment of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) because mindfulness is integral to a more civilized, compassionate and humane society in the context of a future dominated by cognitive automation.

Unless the individual’s mind, body and spirit are open to learning (the development of intuition or jñāna), there is no practice of Yoga (Union). Given the appropriate pedagogical tools for learning, in the absence of any instruction, the child will find one’s own creative inspiration to attain achievement (sańkalpa saḿsiddhiḥ).

My Equipment

1. Tahiti Onyx superlight massage table with terry towelling fitted sheet set

Tahiti Onyx Massage Table
2. Therapist’s Thumb bodywork tool from Core Products

There are various bodywork tools in the market such as the Jacknobber, but I found the Therapist’s Thumb from Core Products to be the most intuitive tool for deep tissue bodywork. The Therapist’s Thumb was originally designed and made by Curt and Gina Nuenke, owners of BodyNiché Massage Studio.

Therapist Thumb
Therapist Thumb
Therapist Thumb
Therapist Thumb
Therapist Thumb

3. Contoured Face Cradle

I replaced the poorly manufactured original cradle that came with my massage table with a contoured one made of heavy grade steel and aluminium frame with oak wood face plate.

Face Cradle Comparison
Original ABS Plastic Face Cradle
DevLon NorthWest Contoured Face Cradle (Oak Wood)

4. Set of hard spikey balls from China

I have a set of hard spikey balls in three small sizes for specific muscle knots.

Spikey Balls

5. Digital TENS/EMS combo unit

Digital TENS/EMS

Flow and Being Nirāčārya

Nirāčārya: Jack of All Trades and Master of None

No one can claim mastery of anything, because absolute mastery is a misrepresentation. An individual can only, within reason, demonstrate competence within a role-based scenario.

I base this essay about being nirāčārya on my actual challenges as a creative designer, and my impetus for transition (sandhyā) from one role to another, in a troubling and uncertain economic climate. I claim the non-glamorous title of being nirāčārya – a Jack of All Trades and a Master of None. I am a generalist who derives innovation from dispassion (vairāgya) from modality. In my experience, being nirāčārya involves a dynamic and pragmatic quality of, typically haptic, engagement, which I define as mindfulness (a.k.a. flow).

Flow = Mindfulness

Mindfulness is not meditation, although it can be an object of meditation, e.g. mindfulness meditation.

The practice of mindfulness can be a means (upāya) and an end (upeya) in itself.

The term “flow” is being used in creative circles to mean mindfulness, which is the experience of being in the zone where your creative juices flow, unabated.

Massage therapy, which I am currently studying and practicing, involves the flow of partner communication between therapist and client.

Mindfulness supports the capacity to learn and adapt to challenge.

Water

Lower Limb Anatomy

Knee & Hip Joint

Muscle Origin Insertion Action Innervation
Sartorius Anterior Superior Iliac Spine (ASIS) Anteriomedial Surface of the Proximal Tibia in the Pes Anserinus Flex Knee & Flex, Abduct, Laterally Rotate Hip Femoral Nerve
Gracilis Pubic Ramus Anteriomedial Surface of the Proximal Tibia in the Pes Anserinus Flex Knee & Flex, Adduct, Medially Rotate Hip Obturator Nerve
Pectineus Pecten Pubis Pectineal Line of the Femur Adduct & Flex Hip Femoral Nerve
Quadraceps Femoris
Rectus Femoris Anterior Inferior Iliac Spine (AIIS) & Upper Lip of the Acetabulum Tibial Tuberosity Extend Knee & Flex Hip Femoral Nerve
Vastus Medialis Medial Lip of the Linea Aspera Tibial Tuberosity Extend Knee Femoral Nerve
Vastus Lateralis Lateral Lip of the Linea Aspera Tibial Tuberosity Extend Knee Femoral Nerve
Vastus Intermedius Lateral & Anterior Surfaces of the Femur Tibial Tuberosity Extend Knee Femoral Nerve
Hamstrings
Biceps Femoris Ischial Tuberosity (Long Head) & Linea Aspera (Short Head) Head of Fibula & Lateral Condyle of Tibia Extend Hip (Long Head) & Flex Knee Sciatic Nerve
Semimembranosus Ischial Tuberosity Posterior Medial Condyle of Tibia Extend Hip Sciatic Nerve
Semitendinosis Ischial Tuberosity Anteriomedial Surface of the Proximal Tibia in the Pes Anserinus Extend Hip Sciatic Nerve

Hip Joint

Muscle Origin Insertion Action Innervation
Tensor Fasciae Latae Anterior Iliac Crest, Anterior Superior Iliac Spine (ASIS) Iliotibial Band Adduct & Flex Hip Superior Gluteal Nerve
Iliopsoas (Psoas Major & Iliacus)
Psoas Major T12 & Lumbar Vertebrae Lesser Trochanter Flex Hip Lumbar Plexus
Iliacus Iliac Fossa Lesser Trochanter Flex Hip Femoral Nerve
Anterior Hip Muscles
Lateral Rotators
Obturator Internus Obturator Membrane Greater Trochanter Laterally Rotate Hip Nerve to Obturator Internus
Obturator Externus Obturator Foramen Greater Trochanter Laterally Rotate Hip Posterior Branch of Obturator Nerve
Gemellus Inferior Ischial Tuberosity Obturator Internus Tendon Laterally Rotate Hip Nerve to Quadratus Femoris
Gemellus Superior Ischial Spine Obturator Internus Tendon Laterally Rotate Hip Nerve to Obturator Internus
Piriformis Sacrum Greater Trochanter Laterally Rotate Hip Nerve to the Piriformis
Quadratus Femoris Ischial Tuberosity Intertrochanteric Crest Adduct & Laterally Rotate Hip Nerve to Quadratus Femoris
Adductors
Adductor Longus Below Pubic Tubercle Middle Third of Linea Aspera Adduct, Flex & Medially Rotate Hip Obturator Nerve
Adductor Brevis Inferior Pubic Ramus Proximal Portion of Linea Aspera Adduct, Flex & Medially Rotate Hip Obturator Nerve
Adductor Magnus Inferior Pubic Ramus & Ischial Ramus (Oblique Head); Ischial Tuberosity (Vertical Head) Gluteal Tuberosity, Linea Aspera & Proximal Supracondylar Line of Femur (Oblique Head); Adductor Tubercle (Vertical Head) Adduct & Flex Hip (Oblique Head); Extend Hip (Vertical Head) Obturator Nerve (Oblique Head); Sciatic Nerve (Vertical Head)
Gluts
Gluteus Maximus Posterior of Gluteal Surface of Ilium, Back of Sacrum, Sacrotuberous Ligament Gluteal Tuberosity of Femur; Iliotibial Band Extend Hip; External Rotation Inferior Gluteal Nerve
Gluteus Medius Gluteal Surface of Ilium Greater Trochanter Abduct Hip; Internal Rotation Superior Gluteal Nerve
Gluteus Minimus Gluteal Surface of Ilium Greater Trochanter Abduct Hip; Internal Rotation Superior Gluteal Nerve
Posterior Hip Muscles

Ankle Joint

Muscle Origin Insertion Action Innervation
Tibialis Anterior Anterior Tibia; Interosseus Margin Medial Cuneiform & First Metatarsal Dorsiflex Ankle & Invert Foot Deep Fibular Nerve
Tibialis Posterior Tibia & Fibula Navicular & Medial Cuneiform Bone Plantar Flex Ankle & Invert Foot Tibial Nerve
Calf (a.k.a. Triceps Surae)
Gastrocnemius Medial Condyle of Femur (Medial Head); Lateral Condyle of Femur (Lateral Head) Posterior Calcaneus via Calcaneal Tendon Plantar Flex Foot & Flex Knee Tibial Nerve
Soleus Fibula & Medial Border of Tibia Posterior Calcaneus via Calcaneal Tendon Plantar Flex Foot Tibial Nerve

Sub-Talar Joint

Muscle Origin Insertion Action Innervation
Fibularis
Fibularis Longus Upper Lateral Shaft of Fibula Medial Cuneiform & First Metatarsal Platar Flex Ankle & Evert Foot Superficial Fibular Nerve
Fibularis Brevis Lateral Fibula Fifth Metatarsal Plantar Flex Ankle & Evert Foot Superficial Fibular Nerve
Fibularis Tertius Distal Anterior Surface of Fibula Dorsal Surface of Fifth Metatarsal Dorsiflex Ankle & Evert Foot Deep Fibular Nerve

Shoulder Anatomy

Muscle Origin Insertion Action Innervation
Thoracodorsal Joint
Trapezius Occipital Bone, Ligamentum Nucahe, C7-T12 Vertebrae Spinous Processes Lateral Third of the Clavicle, Acromion & Medial End of the Spine of the Scapula Upper (descending part): Elevate Scapula & Extend Neck; Middle: Retract Scapula; Lower (ascending part): Depress Scapula; descending & ascending parts act together to rotate upward Spinal Accessory Nerve
Rhomboid Minor & Major C7-T1 & T2-T5 Spinous Processes Medial Border of the Scapula Retract Scapula & Rotate Scapula Downward Dorsal Scapular Nerve (C4 & C5)
Serratus Anterior Lateral Surfaces of the Upper Eight Ribs Medial Border of the Scapula Protract Scapula & Rotate Scapula Upward Long Thoracic Nerve
Levator Scapulae Transverse Processes of the Upper Cervical Vertebrae Medial Border of the Scapula Elevate the Scapula Dorsal Scapular Nerve (C5) & Ventral Primary Rami of C3 & C4
Pectoralis Minor Third, Fourth & Fifth Ribs Coracoid Process Draws the Scapula Forward and Downward Medial & Lateral Pectoral Nerves
Glenohumeral Joint
Pectoralis Major Sternum, Costal Cartilage Ribs 1-6, Medial Half of the Clavicle, Aponeurosis of Obliquus Externus Abdominis Lateral Lip of Intertubercular Groove Internally Rotate, Flex & Adduct Shoulder Medial & Lateral Pectoral Nerves
Deltoid Lateral Third of the Clavicle, Acromion & the Spine of the Scapula Deltoid Tubercle on the Lateral Surface of the Humerus Abduct Shoulder Axillary Nerve
Coraco-brachialis Coracoid Process Medial Mid-shaft Humerus Flex & Adduct Shoulder Musculocutaneous Nerve
Latissimus Dorsi Spinous Processes of Inferior 6 Thoracic Vertebrae, Iliac Crest, Sacrum, Thoracolumbar Fascia, Inferior 3 or 4 ribs Floor of Intertubercular Groove Extend, Internally Rotate & Adduct Shoulder Thoracodorsal Nerve
Teres Major Inferior Angle of Scapula Medial Lip of Intertubercular Groove Internally Rotate & Adduct Shoulder Lower Subscapular Nerve
Rotator Cuff
Supraspinatus Supraspinous Fossa Top of the Greater Tubercle of Humerus External Rotation Suprascapular Nerve
Infraspinatus Infraspinous Fossa Back of the Greater Tubercle of Humerus External Rotation Suprascapular Nerve
Teres Minor Lateral Border Inferior of the Greater Tubercle of Humerus External Rotation Axillary Nerve
Subscapularis Subscapular Fossa Lesser Tubercle of Humerus Internal Rotation Subscapular Nerves
Shoulder Muscles